Consolidating all my student loans

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If you don’t have enough entries on your credit record, it can impact your ability to borrow – just as if your credit were poor.

Even returning students and single parents find themselves without adequate borrowing power.

Economic shifts and the globalization of the workforce have contributed to a re-tooling trend among older students who are engaging in post-secondary education.

Adults who are retraining to launch second careers are increasingly recognized by scholarships, grants and loans for single parents returning to college.

Working adults and parents enjoy financial aid for tuition and expenses at institutions like: The student loan market is no longer an exclusive realm for recently-graduated high schoolers hoping to become undergraduate college students.

Non-traditional students have access to many of the same large-scale student assistance programs that other undergraduates rely on, as well as a stable of resources that specifically target returning students and single parents.

Students enrolled in college at least half-time are eligible for federal loans, either through the Direct Federal Loan Program or the Federal Family Education Loan Program (FFELP).

Private lenders subject student borrowers to the same formal credit checks faced by other adults borrowing money, so without solid credit, you’ll need to enlist the help of a student loan cosigner.

Working adults and non-traditional college enrollees are best-served by multi-pronged approaches to landing student aid.

Federal Programs offer the deepest pockets for student borrowers, so due diligence is required pursuing traditional college financing from Uncle Sam.

Private student loans are a double-edged proposition.

On one hand, they provide valuable resources that bridge the affordability gap that’s left when other aid doesn’t get the job done – but they do come with limitations.

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